Fishing for cobia normally entails going with a guide who knows the local area because they are unpredictable. Catching them is not as hard once they are found because they are voracious eaters, though they put up a very strong fight. They can be caught on anything from squid to crabs, shrimp, pinfish, grunts, and other small baitfish. On a fishing charter, the only thing you need is your captain who will show you how to fish for cobia.

Cobia can reach a maximum length of 6 1/2 feet and up to 130 pounds, normally weighing in closer to between twenty and fifty pounds. Their bodies are spindle-shaped with a broad flattened head. The body of the fish is smooth with small scales. Their backs are usually dark brown with a white underbelly with darker horizontal bands on their flanks.

Their large peck fins are normally carried horizontally, perhaps helping the fish look more like a shark. They have very short sharp spines on top of their heads. Cobia are not normally a schooling fish except while they’re in spawning season. It is a pelagic fish but most of the time these fish are targeted in the Gulf of Mexico where they will congregate around reefs and wrecks and other structures.

In the Gulf, fishing for cobia can simply be a matter of locating other large marine animals on the surface. You can usually find them hanging around sharks, turtles, and manta rays. Cobia will follow them to scavenge off the leftovers of their prey. Cobia are usually not afraid of boats because they are curious fish. Most of the time the first thing you think of is a shark when you see them in the water. Size, taste, curiosity, hunger & power make these fish great targets.

For more specific information about fishing for cobia or more cobia fishing tips and pictures, check out Florida Sportsman’s Cobia page.

To book a charter with Capt. Brent Kindell, call 305-481-9018 or fill out the contact form.

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